What is it like to come from two cultures and only be recognized for one?

noviembre 1st, 2011

The Invisible Hafu

二つのルーツを持っていても、普段一つしか認識されない事についてどう思いますか?

ハーフの多様性を示すことがこの映画の目的の一つでもあります。大人として、日本に戻ってくるまで、私はこの多様性に気が付きませんでした。私が知っていたハーフは、私みたいに日本で生まれてインタナショナルスクールの教育を受けた方やアメリカで生まれ育ち、日本語が殆どできないハーフでした。日本に帰ってきてようやく5年が経ち、映画を作り始めてから約2年ですが、とくに制作中は色んな経験をしたハーフに出会っています。ハーフの経験は色んな事情により異なります。例えばどこで育ったか、もう一つの国はどこか、どちらの親が日本人であるか、日本語がどれぐらいできるか等と人それぞれでした。

撮影を始めてから、ハーフのテーマをより深く研究している間に、驚きの事実を知りました。東京を歩き回ると、よく見かける国際カップルの組み合わせは日本人の女性と欧米系の男性ですが、厚生労働省によると最も多い国際カップルは日本人の男性とアジア人の女性(韓国、中国、フィリピン等)だそうです。そのことから、判断できるのは、一番多いミックスの日本人は日本と他のアジアのルーツを持つ人では無いでしょうか?しかし、一般的にはこの様な方々も周りの人は二つのルーツを持っていることに気づかないかもしれません。

私達はそういった経験を持ったハーフのストーリーも伝えたいという想いから、数ヶ月前より房江(ふさえ)さんを取材しています。

房江(35)さんは在日韓国人の父親(日本人に帰化しました)と日本人の母親を持ち、神戸市で生まれ育ちました。外見はいわゆる一般的に「日本人」と思われる人々と変わらないと言えます。差別されないようにと、両親は15歳まで韓国ルーツであることを房江さん本人から隠していました。事実をしった今、振り返ってみると、房江さんは子供の頃父方の祖母が韓国語で話していたり、キムチを作っていたの思い出すと話しています。韓国のルーツを知った時、在日韓国の文化を探り始めましたが、エドが立ち上げたミックスルーツ関西に関わるまで、自分の居場所が見つからなかったそうです。現在、ミックスルーツの子供向けのイベントを企画し、次世代のミックスの子たちが健やかに成長し将来活躍できる環境づくりのサポートに励んでいます。

下記の撮影からの写真です。写真家:Ikon

What is it like to come from two different cultures and only be recognized for one?

One of the things that we are setting out to do with this film is to give audiences a taste of the diversity of the hafu experience. For me, it was only when I came back to Japan as an adult did I begin to realize how many different experiences hafus had. Until then, most of the hafus I had met had either grown up in Japan and gone to international school or those who were born and raised in US and didn’t speak much Japanese. Now that I have been living back in Japan for five years and have been working on this film for nearly two, I have met many hafus with very different experiences. I have come to realize that so many factors play into one’s hafu experience: where you grew up, what your other roots are, which parent is Japanese, whether you speak Japanese or not and so and so forth.

As we began filming and learning more about the hafu experience, we also started researching the little statistical data there is on related matters in Japan. What we discovered at times blew some of our preconceptions.Walking around Tokyo it seem as though the most common combination of mixed couples are Japanese women and Western men but according to the statistical data of the Ministry of Labor, Health and Welfare we found out that the highest combinations of mixed marriages are between Japanese men and women from other Asian countries (China, Korea, Philippines etc).  So this means that many of the mixed-Japanese in Japan today are actually mixed with other Asians and quite possibly go unrecognized as being anything other than Japanese. In order to tell this story, we wanted to find someone who is of asian-mix and hear about her experience growing up in Japan. For the past few months, we have been filming with Fusae.

Fusae was born and raised in Kobe, Japan, to a Korean father–a naturalised Japanese citizen–and a Japanese mother. In order to protect her from discrimination from others, her parents kept her Korean background hidden from her until she was 15–a traumatic experience for her at the time. She now clearly remembers how her paternal grandmother spoke Korean and cooked Korean food. After this revelation, she began exploring differences between Japanese and Korean culture. But 18 years later she is still struggling to redefine her place in society as a Korean/Japanese descendant. She has become actively involved in Mix Roots Kansai as the organizer of children’s events. She feels by organizing such social events, she is helping the younger generation find acceptance with their mixed identities.

Here are some photos from our first shoot with her. Photos taken by Ikon.